20 Comments

Homelessness is a major problem in our world. Not the US alone. My country is poor so the resources to help the homeless is limited. Many suffers from mental health issues that are often ignored. Humanity needs to care more.

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I absolutely agree, Annelise. As a former psychotherapist, I was always appalled at the number of people with mental illness who fall through the cracks (more like chasms) in health care systems and end up hopeless. We have so many where I live because it has a relatively mild climate compared to the rest of Canada. It's heartbreaking.

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Nov 26, 2021Liked by Dascha Paylor

Before the lockdown, I would carry gift cards from the local fast food places and would give them to people in need of a meal. Once I am out and about again, I will probably continue doing that. People are people, no matter how poor or rich they are.

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I used to do the same!

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This is a beautiful story.

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Thanks Bill. 😊

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Feb 12, 2021Liked by Dascha Paylor

A wonderful reminder that we are all people, some have fallen into dire situations. I have spoken to many homeless folks. I believe in acknowledging people we come in close contact eg standing by the door of a store I’m entering. My most long term acquaintance was with a fellow who was laid off from Tim Horton’s. He didn’t live at the homeless camp, he lived in the woods. A baker laid off when Tim’s centralized their bakery and delivered frozen goods to the coffee shops. I would see him at the park, and at the Whatcom Rd,strip mall. We always stopped to chat,he never asked for anything. My husband would give a little of money to help pay for food for his cat. His cat was always on his bicycle in a little box. I have never been homeless ,but I have been poor in my childhood, and in my early adulthood.

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I feel the same way, Barb. I also have never been homeless, but grew up poor after my parents separated. My father never paid child support and my mother raised six kids on a secretary's salary.

We have an unfortunate tendency in our society to cast misfortune as a fault and to blame those afflicted by it. It's a sad reflection of our discomfort with those who remind us of our own vulnerability. It is, of course, far more complex than this, but also far more than can be discussed in a simple comment forum.

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Feb 11, 2021Liked by Dascha Paylor

Beautiful story and reminder that we shouldn’t expect people to “pay” for our kindness, and definitely not by asking them to tell us their story.

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Thank you, Mary!

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Dec 29, 2020Liked by Dascha Paylor

Thanks for the reminder of who the homeless really are. I despair about life's vicissitudes.

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You're welcome. I feel the same.

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I once read an interview that was done with a homeless man and he commented on how people wouldn't even look at him. It made me think a lot about why we turn away and I certainly don't have the answer. But since then, as little a gesture as it seems, whenever I can I always smile and good morning or hi regardless of the appearance of the person. Sometimes they look away but usually they at least smile or mutter hello in response. Honestly, the teenagers are the toughest but even most of them break down and respond. As a result, I've developed a passing acquaintance with a couple of the homeless and what strikes me is that they've never asked me for anything, not for money or food. Nothing. I truly believe they just like being acknowledged. Good story.

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Thank you, Laura. Yes. People usually like being acknowledged. And I don't think most homeless people ask for anything. The people who are more likely to accost you on a street corner are grifting. They go home after they've made whatever for the day. I don't currently have any, but I tend to carry small denomination gift cards and hand them out, allowing for a meal or a hot coffee.

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I've portrayed so many homeless/houseless people, it's a topic very close to me. A brief conversation with anyone on the fringe can truly make a huge difference. If people pictured them sitting in a third grade classroom with the same hopes and dreams as other kids, they'd treat them differently.

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Yes! Homeless people are not "other". They are us. We are the same. There but for the . . . luck, basically.

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Exactly!

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I agree. People are so ready to pass judgment. These are someone's child, someone's sibling. They played and worked, hoped and dreamed. They are human, just like everyone else, regardless of what brought them to and holds them on the street.

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An important story and reminder. Thanks for this, Dascha!

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Thanks for reading it with an open heart, Justin!

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